Bullfighter Savagely Gored in Front of Horrified Audience

Daniel Garcia Navarette, 23, was making his debut performance as a bullfighter in Madrid in front of thousands of people when things went horribly, horribly wrong in the arena. Navarette was flipped in the air and fell by the bull, which weighed over 1,000 lbs. As Navarette fell to the ground, the bull gored him with his horns. Navarette was gored in the throat, face and tongue multiple times. As the bull attacked him, he rolled around on the ground, trying desperately to protect himself from further injury. He also suffered damage to nerve tissue and a broken collarbone. The audience watched in horror. Navarette was rushed to the hospital in serious condition. One of the wounds was so deep that it penetrated the roof of his mouth. Assistants rushed into the arena to try to help Navarette, but the bull was uncontrollable. Members of the crowd later remarked that they believed they were seeing Navarette being killed before them.

Bullfighting is a violent and bloody sport, and so are the facts and figures that go along with it.
WARNING: GRAPHIC IMAGES


A dangerous sport. Looking at some statistics, bullfighting is, not surprisingly, a dangerous and brutal sport.The prestigious San Isidro bullfight has been suspended after three matadors were gored in one day. This is actually rarer than the uninitiated might expect – it’s the first suspension for 35 years. So how dangerous is bullfighting, asks Tom de Castella. Bullfighting is a “supremely dangerous art”, says Garry Marvin, professor of human-animal studies at Roehampton University.


Statistics. “If a normal person got into the ring with a fighting bull, I’d expect them to be severely gored or dead in a few moments.” Matadors are highly skilled, however, and may go several seasons without injury. What do the figures say? Bullfighting in Spain is run by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport – but surprisingly no statistics on injuries are kept.

Daniel Garcia Navarette. Daniel Garcia Navarette, 23, was making his debut performance as a bullfighter in Madrid in front of thousands of people when things went horribly, horribly wrong in the arena. Navarette was flipped in the air and fell by the bull, which weighed over 1,000 lbs. As Navarette fell to the ground, the bull gored him with his horns. Navarette was gored in the throat, face and tongue multiple times. As the bull attacked him, he rolled around on the ground, trying desperately to protect himself from further injury. He also suffered damage to nerve tissue and a broken collarbone. The audience watched in horror. Navarette was rushed to the hospital in serious condition. One of the wounds was so deep that it penetrated the roof of his mouth. Assistants rushed into the arena to try to help Navarette, but the bull was uncontrollable. Members of the crowd later remarked that they believed they were seeing Navarette being killed before them.

Brutal injuries suffered by other matadors. Some unofficial figures do exist, however. In the 2013 season, 31 matadors received horn wounds, according to the datoros.com website. Some were minor, some life-threatening. As well as the matadors themselves, 16 of their assistants were injured – the assistants usually include “picadors” on horseback, “banderilleros” on foot, and a sword page.

Facts and figured. These 47 injuries occurred during a total of 661 bullfights in Spain in 2013 (the ministry does count how many bullfights take place). The profession is less perilous than it was, thanks to advances in medicine.

Gruesome. The invention of penicillin helped, and today at big bullrings specialist surgeons are on standby to operate.

Incomplete data. of Into The Arena: The World of the Spanish Bullfight, cites records showing that 533 professional bullfighters have been killed in Spain since 1700.

The numbers could be even higher. The records may be incomplete, as bullfighting has only been regulated for 100 years.

Life changing injuries. When matadors are hurt, the injuries can be gruesome. In October 2011, Juan Jose Padilla was blinded in one eye by a horn. He was back six months later.

More deaths. Colombian Jose Eslava Caceres, was trapped against boards at the edge of the ring in 1987, and suffered a fatal piercing of the lung.

Sparing the bull. While the matador is there by choice, the bull is not. It dies every time, apart from rare occasions where both bull and matador perform exceptionally well. In these cases, the bull’s life is spared.

Banned. When the Parliament of Catalonia, an autonomous region in northeastern Spain, solemnly banned bullfighting in 2010, it was not simply a victory for animal rights. There was a political angle, as well, involving a battle over regional and national identity.

Catalonia. Catalan nationalists were beginning their push toward full independence from Spain, a movement that is reaching a critical point. Getting rid of the bullfights, seen by many as quintessentially Spanish, sent a message as blunt as a graffiti slogan: “Catalonia is not Spain.”

Common cultural heritage. Now the Constitutional Court in Madrid has struck back. In a ruling on Oct. 20, it repealed the Catalan ban. The court’s finding was partly that the regional Parliament went beyond its mandate, but crucially, also, that bullfighting is a “common cultural heritage” of Spain.

Foreign tourists fuel the sport. Despite all this fuss, bullfighting has been on the wane for decades. According to a government survey, scarcely one in 10 Spaniards ever attends a bullfight. Even before the ban, Catalonia’s biggest bullring had struggled to fill a third of its seats — and then only thanks to busloads of foreign tourists.

Source : RebelCircus

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